Sheldon Lavin’s Entry Into Food Wholesale And Path To Winning Global Visionary

Sheldon Lavin is CEO of one of America’s top meat wholesale distributors and can be credited for making the company into a huge international merchant. That company is OSI Group, a company based in Chicago but with operations in many countries beyond the US borders. Lavin stayed true to a dream he had when he took over to turn the company into not just a profitable enterprise, but one that valued people the most.

As a result of OSI Group’s great impact, Sheldon Lavin won the 2016 Global Visionary Award from Global Vision Academy. Lavin has also won the North American Meat Institute’s Edward Jones award for community service by a meat industry executive.

Sheldon Lavin was an accounting and investing professional before he joined OSI Group. But after years working in the bank offices, he stepped down to run his own consulting firm. During this time Otto & Sons, the original name of OSI Group asked him to join their company on a part time basis to offer guidance in financial structuring and investing.

In the early 1970s Sheldon Lavin was asked to take over as company CEO, an offer he wasn’t interested in at first because he wanted to stick to Financial Consulting. But after discussing it some more with the owners and hearing from the McDonalds Corporation how much they wanted him to join, he decided to buy the owner’s shares and run the company.

Sheldon Lavin changed the name of Otto & Sons to OSI Group because it started becoming a worldwide operating company. Even just this last year they opened a new plant in the Philippines. Some strategic acquisitions they made were Flagship Europe, though they asked the current CEO Russell Maddock to stay, and several plants owned by Baho Food and Tyson Food.

Sheldon Lavin also had made sure OSI Group adheres to some of the industry’s tightest safety regulations, and doing so helped OSI Group win the British Safety Council’s Globe of Honour. Lavin’s community service work includes giving to the Jewish United Fund, the Multiple Sclerosis National Society, and the Ronald McDonald House Charities Foundation.